Jim SocumShot DoctorBandage Ball

Volume 2 Number 10 January 1, 2010
The road to success is not doing one thing 100 percent better, but doing 100 things 0ne percent better.
 

HESIE FAKES PART 3  

Hesie Fake Part 3

FOUR STAGES
PREP STAGE
CRUNCH HESIES
KNEE HESIES

The hesie fake technique moves from leg kicking fakes into toros and knee hesie fakes.  The shooter first understands the theory of throwing and then moves on to the hesie fake. The hesies to be discussed are the knee and crunch hesies.  The hesie fake is a pause or break in the right arm motion or torso motion.  The knee, abdominal muscles and left hand are used in these hesie fakes to pause the arm in mid-air.  The crunch hesie snaps the shooter's torso forward by using the abs or left hand.  The knee hesie shooter uses the left or right knee to create one or more pauses in the throwing motion. The use of these hesie fakes requires the shooter to have great body control and body awareness as the knees are raised up and down or the torso is snapped forward.  The use of crunch and knee hesies opens up a vast array of faking options for the shooter.  The shooter sinks the goalie with a pause in the arm motion and throws the ball at an open goal. A strong arm is no longer necessary to score, only a strong hesie.

FOUR STAGES OF THROWING

Figure 1

Figure 1

Before discussing hesies, the theory of throwing mechanics needs to be understood.  The shooter learns how to cock the body for potential power and to accelerate the body for a powerful shot.  There are four major body positions for throwing the ball with each one having a dramatic effect on power production.  When the shooter's body is square to the goal the shooter is in neutral and has a 4-inch long arm cock with little potential power to throw the ball.  The over-square shooter with the right foot extremely forward positions the shooter in the follow-through stage where the ball can barely be thrown (see fourth figure).  The prep stage is a body angled 30-degrees between the left shoulder and right hip that prepares the shooter's body to be cocked.  When the body is angled at greater than 30-degrees the body is in the cocking stage.  Once the body is angled and cocked the shooter explodes into the acceleration stage (release stage) and shoots the ball.  The follow-through stage arrives after the ball is released and the body slows, turns and stops by bringing the right leg forward.

The knee hesie and the crunch hesie may square the shooter's body and require the shooter to reposition the body at 30-degrees so the ball can then be cocked.  The cocking stage requires the shooter's whole body to be cocked and not just the right arm.  The acceleration stage requires the shooter to use the whole body to throw the ball and not only the right arm.  The rule for the acceleration stage is: elevate, rotate, crunch and snap. A strong hesie produces a strong shot.  The shooter's right arm during these stages is part of a well-positioned whole body, which creates an upward and accelerating cascade of force  traveling from the large muscles (legs) into the small muscles (right arm) to throw the ball and stop the body.  A strong hesie and a weak shot is a square shooter (see Fig. 1).

PREP STAGE:  THE 30-DEGREE ANGLE 

Figure 2

Figure 2

The preparatory stage or prep stage angles the body at a 30-degree angle between the left shoulder point and the right hip in the prep stage so the body can then be cocked to throw the ball.  When doing a hesie the shooter may momentarily get into a square body position.  A square body position must be immediately fixed to regain the 30-degree left shoulder/right hip angle prep stage.  Crunch hesies and knee hesies during the faking motion move the right foot and right elbow forward and require the shooter to reposition the body after the fake.  If this event is not corrected the shooter becomes square to the goal and takes a weak shot. The shooter must be angled in the preparatory stage to move smoothly into the cocked stage so the shooter's body can take a powerful shot. After the hesie, the well-positioned shooter advances from the prep stage into the cocking stage (a sharp left shoulder point, the right hip and leg rotated back) and then into the acceleration stage to throw the ball (see Fig.2).

Figure 3

Figure 3

The acceleration stage is composed of four sub stages: elevation, rotate, crunch, and the snap.  The player elevates with the legs, rotates the hips and crunches the abdominal muscles.  The fourth stage, the release and throws the ball.  The body moves through these four stages sequentially.  A square body position does not allow elevation, hip rotation and greatly weakens the torso flexing forward to throw the ball (see Fig. 3).

The crunch and knee hesies force the right elbow and right foot to move forward during the fake often and squares the player.  For a demonstration of the effect of positioning have the player stand on the deck with feet under his hips with the hips and shoulders square in an uncocked position and then throw the ball.  Then the player positions the left shoulder and the right hip at a 30-degree angle for the prep stage.  From the prep stage the player transitions, swings the right leg back and creates an angled body with a sharp left shoulder point with the right hip and leg back.  Another on deck demonstration is to move the right elbow too far forward and see the right foot move under the right hand and in front of the shoulder for a square body position.  Next move the elbow behind the shoulder and the right foot scoots back to its previous position.  The player must reset and repositioned the body to maintain the 30-degree left shoulder/right hip prep stage angle.

CRUNCH HESIES

AB CRUNCH HESIE

Figure 4

Figure 4

The ab crunch hesie resembles the crunch sit up where the torso is snapped forward.  The shooter snaps the torso forward as a hesie fake to get the goalie to jump early.  The shooter uses the abdominal muscles to flex the torso forward a foot.  The ball is pinched, short arm cock, contract the abs, flex the torso and scull furiously with the left hand for support.  The legs are apart with the left foot forward and the right leg back using a mild scissor kick.  Women with their more balanced body are better able to do a crunch hesie compared to the men.  Women have a short light torso with long legs, a wider base and a lower center of gravity that allows them to snap the torso forward without tipping over.  The shooter never brings the ball and elbow too far forward of the shoulder or it becomes difficult to straighten up the torso to re-cock and shoot quickly.  It is a common mistake to exaggerate the ab fake and have the ball and elbow too far forward when learning the hesie (see Fig. 4).

LEFT HAND CRUNCH HESIE

Figure 5

Figure 5

The left hand crunch hesie uses the left hand to crunch the shooter's torso forward instead of the abs.  The shooter's left hand is palm up and pushes water upward to pull the torso forward for the crunch hesie.  The left hand flips over to a palm down position and pushes downward to right the shooter's torso.  The left hand can move up and down several times and create a double crunch hesie.  The left hand crunch hesie is a more difficult hesie to master than the ab crunch hesie (see Fig. 5).

BACK CRUNCH HESIE

Figure 6

Figure 6

The back crunch hesie is a deceptive shot that fools the goalie into believing that the shot is not coming.  All of the goalie clues (elevation, left shoulder point & rotation, torso and elbow movement) are absent.  The square player has the ball in the hand and then the ball is in the goal.  The quick shot is not the result of a quick wrist shot but is the result of a plyometric torso movement that creates no clue for the goalie.  The back and abs throw the ball.  The shooter arches the back to an extreme degree to cock the back and contract the back muscles (gray).  The abdominal muscles are prestressed (red) and tight in the plyometric stretch.  The shooter then quickly shoots the ball at the goal by contracting the abdominal muscles.  Right arm movement is minimal. The back hesie shot is thrown when the shooter is on 1-spot (EU 5-spot) or the 6-spot (EU 1-spot) and the goalie is asleep.  The back crunch hesie is a rarely used hesie.  However, it teaches the shooter how to set up the torso plyometrically for a quick and deceptive shot (see Two-Meter Shots Part 4).  A good drill is to pass the ball in groups of two using the back crunch hesie shot (see Fig. 6).

A demonstration drill has the player lean back in a chair and arch the back until the abs are stretched and then do a crunch sit up.  With the abdominal muscles preloaded and stretched, the torso instantly snaps forward because the abdominal muscle fibers are already activated.  The second demonstration for a non-plyometric muscle contraction is to slump in a chair and then try to quickly do a crunch sit up.  The non-stressed abdominal sit up is quite slow because the muscle was not preloaded.

KNEE HESIES

LEFT KNEE HESIE

Figure 7

Figure 7

The left knee hesie uses the raised left knee of the shooter to stop the forward torso motion (also called a crunch hesie). The shooter begins the arm movement to shoot the ball, at the same time the lifts the left knee high up in the water which stops the shooter's torso, causing the right arm to pause in mid-air.  The right elbow and ball move slightly forward of the shooter's shoulder.  Do not allow the ball to get too far forward or the shooter's body becomes square and bent over.  The left knee hesie can be repeated as a fake.  The left hand can be added with the palm up and pushing towards the surface (see Fig. 7). 

ELBOW KNEE HESIE    

Figure 8

Figure 8

The second knee hesie fake is the elbow knee hesie.  The shooter's right arm pauses in mid-air caused by the left knee lifting up, the right arm is  re-cocked, the left knee drops with the ball pinched is quickly thrown the ball into the high corner.  The elbow dips slightly and appears to stop the right arm in mid-throw.  However, the shooter's left knee lift stops (pauses) the right arm.  The slight dip in the right elbow is an effect and not the cause of the hesie (see Fig. 8).

The danger for the shooter when using the elbow knee hesie is he or she tries to stop the right arm in mid-flight with the elbow instead of lifting left knee to stop the arm.  This is a common mistake.   When the shooter tries to stop the right arm by bending the elbow in mid-air, the result is tendinitis in the elbow.  The left knee stops the right arm and not the right arm.  By the shooter lifting the left knee, the torso motion is stopped.  When the shooter's torso stops, the right arm stops.  For the ball to be thrown the torso must complete its forward motion.  This knee action creates the pause in the right arm motion.  The goalie sees the right arm moving forward and jumps early, the ball arrives hundreds of a second late and the shot scores on the sinking goalie.

DOUBLE KNEE HESIE 

Figure 9

Figure 9

Figure 10

Figure 10

The double knee hesie is a two-pause fake that uses a different knee to pause the right arm each time.  The first arm pause has the left knee lift up and the second arm pause has the right knee lift up.  To shoot the ball, the shooter's right knee drops down, the square body resets, and the body is cocked and then the ball is released.  The double knee hesie requires the shooter to rapidly switch from a raised left knee to a raised right knee and switch back to a shooting position  The two knees have work at hyper speed to do a double knee hesie.  The hesie faker must space out the arm pauses and stop on a dime twice.  The shooter cannot make the second stop of the right arm late.  The result is the ball is too far forward and moves into the release zone. The ball must pause in the pause zone (behind shoulder), not in the release zone (past the face).  To release the ball in follow-through zone where the right foot is forward and the body turning and slowing creates a weak and a painful shot (see Fig. 9, 10).   

Figure 11

Figure 11

After the second pause, the square shooter resets the left shoulder/right hip at 30-degrees, cocks the hip but not the arm and takes a lightning-fast shot.  The ball never gets in front of the shoulder until the ball is released. If the shooter does not reset the body and shoots out of a square position or follow-through position the shot is weak.  The hesie shooter does not re-cock the right arm but shoots off the momentum and a short arm cock.  The right arm moves forward, stops twice and releases the ball. For the pump faker, used to swinging the right backward every time, it is extremely difficult move to control and space.  The hesie is a two-body part differential motion: right arm continues moving forward; the hips move forward and back.  The double knee hesie is the forward movement of the arm towards the goal. The goalie jumps on the first pause, is sinking on the second pause, as the ball goes over the goaltender's head (see Fig. 11).

Conclusion

The modern shooter masters the crunch hesies and knee hesies, maintains the 30-degree angle prep stage, cocks the body, accelerates and dominates the goalie.  There are three crunch hesies and three knee hesies that the player masters to become a complete shooter.  The shooter selects the hesie that fits his or her shooting style.  The complete shooter analyses the goalie, set ups the goalie, sinks him or her and scores.  For this to happen, the hesie shooter has to be physically strong and lift weights year-round.   The use of the hesie fakes changes the shooter into a highly skilled and a high scoring player.

Copyright 2009 Jim Solum

Next Month Hesie Fakes Part 4

This is a five-part series on fakes condensed from Dr. Solum's book The Science of Shooting.

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