Jim SocumShot DoctorBandage Ball

Volume 2 Number 11 Febuary 1, 2010
The road to success is not doing one thing 100 percent better, but doing 100 things 0ne percent better.
 

HESIE FAKES PART 4  

Hesie Fakes

SHOULDER HESIE
HEAD HESIE
HUNGARIAN SHOULDER HESIE
SINGLE HESIE
AZEVEDO DOUBLE HESIE

The shooter has learned the leg hesies, crunch and knee hesies and now advances to five new hesie fakes: two shoulder hesies, the head hesie, the single hesie and the Azevedo double hesie.  Each hesie concentrates on using one body part as a fake to deceive the goalie.  The days of swinging the right arm back and forth with a pump fake are over. The shoulder hesie uses the shoulder to deceive the goalie and get him or her to jump early. The head hesie also gets the goalie to jump.  The advanced Hungarian shoulder hesie uses multiple shoulder fakes to confuse the goalie.  The single hesie is a one-arm pause fake and the Azevedo double hesie is a two-arm pause fake that causes the goalie leap early as the arm moves forward. 

SHOULDER HESIE  

Figure 1

Figure 1

The shooter snaps the left shoulder to the left sharply one time and shoots at the right corner from center cage or above the right corner position.  The shooter starts the shoulder hesie by relaxing the left arm that is usually rigid and sculling.  The shooter's left arm is bent with the elbow below the hand.  The left hand is resting on the surface without sculling.  If the shooter's left arm is rigid the left shoulder cannot move.  To do the shoulder hesie the shooter snaps the left shoulder to the left with the left hand splashing water while rotating to the left.  The shooter's hips rotate the shoulders to create the shoulder hesie.  It takes a while for the shooter to understand that he or she does not need a sculling left arm and can freely throw the left arm to the side.  The hand is kept close to the surface of the water to generate a big splash.  The goalie reads the shooter's left shoulder movement and jumps to the left corner to block the apparent shot, as ball is thrown at the right corner.  The goalie believes wherever the shooter's left shoulder points, the ball follows.  The goalie does not look at the ball as commonly believed.  The goalie looks at the shooter's body motion to determine what corner to jump toward.  The shoulder hesie is a good hesie for women (see Fig. 1).

HEAD HESIE   

Figure 2

Figure 2

The shooter's head hesie is an adjunct fake to the shooter's shoulder hesie.  The head fake is not done by itself.  The head fake was invented because the goalie watches the shooter's left shoulder rotation and the head rotation.  The shooter's head and left shoulder snap hard to the left to duplicate the body rotation.  The shooter's head snaps once but rarely twice to the left to get the goalie to jump early and to the left corner.  The shooter's head does not bob up and down, move slowly or turn to the left and right.  Remember, it is a quick and hard head fake not an exaggerated head motion.  Do not over do this fake as it is a subtle movement.  A video taping of the shooter's head fake illustrates to the player how well the head hesie is being performed (see Fig. 2).

HUNGARIAN SHOULDER HESIE 

The Hungarian shoulder hesie uses multiple left shoulder fakes with the left hand sculling underwater.  The shooter's left shoulder rotates back and forth two to three times.  The ball is held high in the air with the arm motionless and above the shoulder.  Do not use a long arm cock arm extension.  The shooter's body moves the right arm.  The hesie fake is a left shoulder motion.  The shooter does not pump fake the ball.  The shooter surrenders to the (body) motion and lets the body motion move the right arm. The use of the shooter's left hand is unique.  In a sense, the Hungarian shoulder hesie is a combination of left hand and the hip movement making a shoulder fake.  The goalie sees the left shoulder rotating but it is only the effect and not the cause of the shoulder hesie.  The rotation of the shooter's left shoulder is the result of the left hand sculling motion and hip rotation.  The left shoulder does not rotate by itself.  Together the shooter's left hand and the hips rotate the shoulders.  The left arm is bent with the hand above the elbow.  The sculling of the left hand moves the left shoulder.  For quick shoulder movements, the left hand makes quick horizontal "V's" in the water.  The movement of the left hand moves the left shoulder side to side.  For larger and slower shoulder movement the left hand makes horizontal "L's."  The shooter's left arm has to be "alive" to be able to move quickly in many directions.  For a shooter that is used to having a rigid left arm with the left hand sculling on the surface this is a challenge.  The creativity of the shoulder hesie and its whole body movement takes awhile for the player to get used to.

The hips play a big part in the shoulder rotation by rotating the body to the left and right. When the hips turn the shooter's feet to the left, the left shoulder rotates to the left.  When the shooter's feet are turned to the right, the left shoulder rotates to the right.  All body rotation is controlled by the hips.  For a demonstration have the player stand with his or her hands on the right hip joint and turn to move the right foot to the right or left without moving the hip.  It cannot be done.  Next have the player on his or her heels and rotate to the left and the body and the left shoulder rotate to the left.  The shoulder hesie is a whole body fake that uses the shooter's entire body to rotate the left shoulder.  The effect of the multiple shoulder fakes is to completely confuse the goalie that jumps with each shoulder fake.  The Hungarian shoulder hesie in the last couple of years has been replaced by shorter and quicker hesies that do not take as much time to do.

SINGLE HESIE  

Figure 3

Figure 3

Single hesie is a one arm pause.  It is used in a forward moving arm hesie fake. The right arm is moving forward and suddenly stops above the shooter's shoulder, restarts and releases the ball at the high corner of the goal.  The forward moving hesie does not re-cock the arm or move the arm sideways.  The shooter controls the right arm forward movement by the left hand.  The shooter's left hand pulls strongly and stops after 8-inches (20-centimeters).  The effect of the left hand stopping in the water is to stop the torso and the right arm in mid-air.  The left hand restarts and pulls down causing the right arm to restart and move forward and release the ball. This is a lighting fast arm motion and pause.  Do not pause or stop the arm for too long as this breaks the momentum and allows the goalie to recover.  At no time does the shooter's right arm move backward or sideways. At first, the player is disoriented by the stopping and starting of the left hand.  After awhile, the shooter masters the left hand motion and the rhythm involved coordinating the left hand with the right arm during the single hesie fake.  The single hesie is similar to the crunch hesie in the torso motion but substitutes the left hand for the left knee to break the shooter's motion.  The single hesie is a good hesie for women to use.  The drill to practice the single hesie is to eggbeater across the pool in the vertical practicing the hesie fake without the ball.  Another drill is two man passing using the single hesie (see Fig. 3).

AZEVEDO DOUBLE HESIE

Figure 406

Figure 4

The double hesie has two arm pauses, one is a sideways arm motion for the first pause and the second pause is when the arm is moving forward.  The first pause zone starts with a Boyer step-out and arm pause.  The second pause has the right arm moving straight ahead and stopping before the shooter's shoulder.  The shooter must be aware of the location of the second pause zone (behind the shoulder), the release zone (60-degrees angle past the head) and the follow-through zone (1-inch or 2.5-centimeters after the ball is released).  The first pause of the double hesitation fake is the Boyer 30-degree step-out movement with the left hand pushing out sideways to a stop (see Skip Shots Part 3, 4).  In the first pause zone, the shooter pinches the ball in the hand using the standard cocking posture and then steps-out at a 30-degree angle and stops.  The right arm is not moving forward as it was in the single hesie but is moving sideways for the first pause.  The player must be able to do a Boyer shot to be able to complete the first part of the Azevedo double hesie.  Once the shooter has mastered the right leg step-out movement the second part of the hesie is taught (see Fig. 4). 

In the second pause zone, the right arm moves forward as in the single hesie with the left hand high and pulling downward. The shooter's right leg, once to the side is moved back behind the player to reposition the right arm back far behind the head.  The shooter's body is in the standard shooting posture of having the left foot forward and the right leg straight back. The shooter's right arm accelerates forward and stops behind the shoulder (as in the single hesie).  The shooter uses a combination of right leg step-out and left hand to stop the arm's motion twice.  The right arm restarts and releases the ball in the release zone passed the shooter's face.  The follow-through zone begins immediately after the ball leaves the shooter's hand.

Figure 5

Figure 5

The shooter stops the arm in the first pause zone on the diagonal step-out.  Then the shooter stops the arm in the second pause zone before the shoulder.  The ball must be released in the release zone and not an quarter-inch later (double lines in picture).  The follow-through zone begins immediately after the ball reaches a specific spot in front of the face at about 60-degrees and 12-16-inches (30-40-centimeters) depending on the length of the shooter's arm. The once the arm reaches the release "spot" the shooter's body automatically moves into the follow-through zone, turns sharply to the left and stops.  It is critical that the shooter understand that the ball must stop behind the shoulder in the second pause zone to maintain the proper arm spacing.  Do not pause the ball in the release zone and have the ball released 2-3 inches (5-8 centimeters) late in the follow-through zone.   Many young hesie shooters become "lost" and delay the second arm pause and miss the pause zone.  By delaying the second pause of the arm, the release of the ball is delayed, and the ball intrudes into the follow-through zone for a very late and weak release (see Fig. 5).   

The end result of the ball being released late is the body is already slowing and turning to left in the follow-through zone (see Hesie Fakes Part 1).  The ball is not released at the apex of it power curve but at the bottom of the power curve.  The result is a weak and painful shot for the shooter.  The shooter must understand the proper spacing of the arm motion.  The right arm does not blindly move forward, pause anywhere and release the ball late in the follow-through zone.  The shooter's right arm has to stop twice, in the proper pause zones, for the double hesie to be effective.  The shooter only has to make an arm spacing mistake once and pain will teach the player the theory just described above.  On a good note, the effect of the double hesie on the goalie is devastating.  The ball stops twice, the goalie jumps early and sinks, and the ball goes over the goalie's head.  The author recently taught a 14-year old boy to do this double hesie so it is possible for the high school player to learn this elite level fake.

DRILLS

The shooter must have good leg, hip and core (abs, low back) strength to do these hesies.  Weak shooters cannot do hesie fakes.  The best drills are sit ups, hyperextensions, squats, and lunges.  Bench presses and quadriceps extensions are not enough.  The water polo player does 150-300 sit ups on a flat bench or a balance ball every day.  The greatest abdominal strength gains are made on the balance ball.  Hyperextensions are reverse sit ups that build up the back muscles.  The exercise is done on the deck or on a balance ball.  The player lies on the stomach and lifts both arms up in the air for 150-300 reps.  To increase back strength, add half a pound to one pound of weight to each hand.  The back must be as strong as the front of the body to prevent front/back imbalance.  Squat jumps without weights are done next with the player standing and bending the knees and jumping up with the arms extended out.  Then add a dumbbell weight to each hand with the hands by the side and continue doing jump squats.  A barbell squat is the next exercise: use a barbell bar without weights and practice doing squats.  As the player improves his or her squat technique add weights to the bar. Finish with lunges where the player is crouching with a barbell on the shoulders and lunges forward with one leg and steps back and then lunges with the opposite leg and repeats for 5 sets of 10. 

In conclusion, the shooter masters the shoulder motion of the single shoulder hesie fake, the head fake and then moves on to the multiple Hungarian shoulder hesie fakes and the single hesie fake the Azevedo double hesie.  The single shoulder hesie causes the goalie to jump due to the shooter's left shoulder rotation.  The head hesie is added to the shoulder hesie for more realism. The Hungarian shoulder hesie adds multiple fakes. The two arm hesies, the single hesie and double hesie are arm pause hesies that cause the goalie to jump when the arm moves forward.  The single hesie requires the left hand to pull down 8-inches (20-centimeters), stop and restart to pause the arm once.  In the double hesie, care must be taken to space out the second arm pause so the ball stops in the correct distance behind the shoulder in the second pause zone so the ball is not released late in the follow-through zone.  The shooter over the last four articles has now mastered the leg, crunch, knee, shoulder and arm hesies to become the complete shooter.  Next month a new shot and new hesie fakes from Genoa, Italy are described.

Copyright 2009 Jim Solum

Next Month Hesie Fakes Part 5

This is a five-part series on fakes condensed from Dr. Solum's book The Science of Shooting.

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